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London Labour Film Festival premieres four new films

London Labour Film Festival premieres four new films

27 March 2014

The London Labour Film Festival will showcase the premiere of four films at the Odeon Cinema, Covent Garden this April and May.
 
The festival’s director Anna Burton said: “The range of films that will be on view are all completely different, but share a common theme: how labour issues affect us as society, as well as on a more personal and emotional level, the individual.
 
“Film is the perfect medium to provoke thought about serious issues, but also to entertain – to make us laugh and also cry in the space of 90 minutes.”
 
The festival runs from 28 April to 2 May inclusive and the details can be accessed via   www.londonlabourfilmfest.com
 
The four film premieres in the programme are:
 
Monday 28 April - Big Society – The Musical – European film premiere
 
Big Society, the musical, centres on Linda who works with young offenders in Liverpool. Facing unemployment, pending the closure of her youth centre, Linda thinks only of Connor, a defiant 14-year-old who has no one apart from her. She risks everything to help him. Director: Lynne Harwood.
 
Wednesday 30 April - Burgos –  European film premiere
 
In April 2007, Jonas Burgos, an agriculturist and a member of the Farmers Alliance of Bulacan, was abducted by seven armed men and a woman in a restaurant in the Philippines. Seven years later, his mother’s tireless crusade to search for her son still goes on; against a background that the possible abduction was carried out by the Philippine military. Director: Joel Lamangan
 
Thursday 1 May -Trash Dance – European film premiere
 
Trash Dance is a film that finds beauty and grace in a completely unexpected place - garbage trucks and in the unseen men and women who pick up the trash in Austin, Texas. Director: Andrew Garrison
 
Friday 2 May - Women’s Day – UK film premiere
 
Described by many as a Polish ‘Erin Brockovich’, Women’s Day follows the troubles of the heroine, Halina Radwan in her fight for justice against an unscrupulous, low-cost supermarket-chain, Motylek (Butterfly).
 
The plot is based on the true story of a former manageress of a cut-price supermarket chain in Poland. She took the chain to court for 26,000 złoty (over 5,000 euros) for 2,500 hours of unpaid overtime. Director: Maria Sadowska
 
ENDS
 
For further information please contact London film festival director Anna Burton on 07768 693972
 
www.londonlabourfilmfest.com
#LLFF14
Twitter @labourfilmfest
facebook: londonlabourfilmfest
 
Twitter: @unitetheunion Facebook: unitetheunion1
 
Notes to editors
•    Unite is Britain and Ireland’s largest trade union with over 1.4 million members working across all sectors of the economy. The general secretary is Len McCluskey.